Location: Fortifications

Discussion: World War 1 FortificationsReported This is a featured thread

Showing 1 - 11 of 11  |  Show  posts at a time
andre573
andre573
World War 1 Fortifications
Apr 11 2008, 12:22 PM EDT | Post edited: Apr 11 2008, 12:22 PM EDT
I have started this page for anyone interested in discussing the role permanent fortifications played in the conflict or the influence they had on development of fortifications in the 1930s.

The major systems in place in the west were: the French line of Sere de Rivieres, that stretched from Switzerland to Belgium, including Belfort, Epinal, Toul, Nancy, Verdun, where major entrenched camps existed; the German "Moselstellung" forts at Metz and Thionville; and the Brialmont forts of Liege, Namur, and Antwerp. I am not as familiar with the systems on the eastern front, however, modern concrete forts existed there as well.

I look forward to the discussions.
1  out of 1 found this valuable. Do you?    
JeffreyLaMonica
JeffreyLaMonica
1. RE: World War 1 Fortifications
Apr 11 2008, 4:07 PM EDT | Post edited: Apr 11 2008, 4:07 PM EDT
I would like to know more about the Russian attack on the Austro-Hungarian fortress at Przemyśl in 1914. Did Przemysl exemplify modern fortifications? Do you find this valuable?    
andre573
andre573
2. RE: World War 1 Fortifications - Przemysl
Apr 11 2008, 6:17 PM EDT | Post edited: Apr 11 2008, 6:17 PM EDT
There is an excellent account of the siege at this location: http://www.greatwardifferent.com/Great_War/Przemysl/Przemysl_Text_01.htm

I have not studied the forts in the east in great extent, however, they appear to exemplify the modern fortifications of the west. The Przemysl system was immense in size and scope and represented an evolution in fortress developments through the 19th Century. The final result that faced the Russians were concrete forts with armored turrets. The suffered the same fast as Liege and Namur, suffering from heavy bombardment by 42 and 30.5cm siege guns, smashing the concrete and dislodging the turrets.

I will attempt to provide more detail at a later date. Thank you for the question.
Do you find this valuable?    

Maginot
3. RE: World War 1 Fortifications
Apr 12 2008, 5:06 PM EDT | Post edited: Apr 12 2008, 5:06 PM EDT
I have sometimes wondered about other German fortifications which may have seen combat if the war had continued beyond November 1918 - the ring forts at Strasbourg, Mainz, and Koln and the fortifications at Landau and Germersheim - all along the Rhine River. There is little about them on the Internet and even less published about them. Do you find this valuable?    
andre573
andre573
4. RE: World War 1 Fortifications
Apr 13 2008, 7:11 AM EDT | Post edited: Apr 13 2008, 7:11 AM EDT
"I have sometimes wondered about other German fortifications which may have seen combat if the war had continued beyond November 1918 - the ring forts at Strasbourg, Mainz, and Koln and the fortifications at Landau and Germersheim - all along the Rhine River. There is little about them on the Internet and even less published about them."
A good example of a fortress that narrowly escaped conflict was the Moselstellung of Metz and Thionville. The Germans abandoned the fortress just hours before the armistice. Metz would have of course been the first permanent fortifications the Americans would have faced and the fighting could have been extremely difficult. In Sep 1944 Patton's XX Corps, Third U.S. Army took 2 months to break through the fortress line at Metz and at the time it was nowhere close to their condition of November 1914 when all the guns worked and the interval defenses were fully ready for combat.

You're right about information on the net. I found quite a few sites in German and Polish on the German forts of Mainz, Koln, Torun (Thorn), and Posen (Poznan). Good luck reading them, however, there are some good maps and photos. There are a couple of English sites thrown in as well:

http://www.crifa.de/festung.php3
http://www.ag-festung-koeln.de/
http://www.koelner-festungsbauten.de/
http://www.altearmee.de/index2.htm
http://www.festung-mainz.de/bibliothek/links.html
http://www.mars.slupsk.pl/fort/tk_start.htm
http://www.poznan.pl/mim/public/turystyka/pages.html?id=37&ch=3382&instance=1017&lang=en
http://festung.posen.prv.pl/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toru%C5%84_Fortress
http://www.his.uni.torun.pl/~wn/twierdza/twierdza.htm
http://wapedia.mobi/en/Toru%C5%84_Fortress
http://www.cheminsdememoire.gouv.fr/page/afficheLieu.php?idLang=de&idLieu=1539
http://www.cheminsdememoire.gouv.fr/page/affichelieu.php?idLang=fr&idLieu=5471
Do you find this valuable?    
JeffreyLaMonica
JeffreyLaMonica
5. RE: World War 1 Fortifications
Apr 13 2008, 9:59 AM EDT | Post edited: Apr 13 2008, 9:59 AM EDT
Maybe someone can post the best of these links on the fortifications page so that visitors to this site can just click on a link to learn more about forts. Do you find this valuable?    
Franzmaximilian
Franzmaximilian
6. RE: World War 1 Fortifications
Jul 1 2008, 11:44 AM EDT | Post edited: Jul 1 2008, 11:44 AM EDT
Should anyone be able to read italian, this link brings to the webpages dedicated to an italian WW1 fort:
http://www.alpinia.net/forte_oga/pagine/index.html

This well preserved WW1 era construction can be visited an hosts a little exhibition.
Though placed too far away from the frontline to see direct combat, the fort fired its guns against the austrian positions at Passo delle Stelvio - StilfserJoch and Monte Scorluzzo. Later during the war the four 120/40 guns were moved to more advanced positions and brought again into the fort 1918 in view of a possible austrian offensive that didn't take place.

I'm not a fortification expert at all nor I ever visited (but this one) the many italian and austrian forts (or ruins) scattered along the italian front.
A superb collection of data and pictures of italian and austrian forts and barrages can be found at http://www.fortificazioni.net/ (italian only)
Regards
Franz
Do you find this valuable?    

mjroman
7. RE: World War 1 Fortifications
Jul 1 2008, 3:07 PM EDT | Post edited: Jul 1 2008, 3:07 PM EDT
Very nice site. Thanks for pointing it out. I have seen photos of Austrian 30.5cm heavy mortars in the Alps and wondered why they were operating there. I think these forts may have been the reason. But I probably ought to read a book before I make that assumption. Regards, Marc Do you find this valuable?    
JeffreyLaMonica
JeffreyLaMonica
8. Italian Forts
Jul 1 2008, 6:03 PM EDT | Post edited: Jul 1 2008, 6:03 PM EDT
Marc,

Please post the two links for the Italian fortifications websites on your "Fortifications" page when you get a chance. Thanks!

JL
Do you find this valuable?    

mjroman
9. RE: Italian Forts
Jul 6 2008, 4:35 PM EDT | Post edited: Jul 6 2008, 4:35 PM EDT
Done! And, I added some new images. I hope to succinctly tell the story of fortifications in WW1 using period images. This appears to be an aspect of the war largely left untold. If anyone can add to the content of the page or increase our understanding of WW1 fortifications, please weigh-in. I look forward to your contibutions. Cheers, Marc Do you find this valuable?    
JeffreyLaMonica
JeffreyLaMonica
10. RE: Italian Forts
Jul 6 2008, 5:42 PM EDT | Post edited: Jul 6 2008, 5:42 PM EDT
Marc,

Thanks for that. Your page looks great!

JL
Do you find this valuable?    

Related Content

  (what's this?Related ContentThanks to keyword tags, links to related pages and threads are added to the bottom of your pages. Up to 15 links are shown, determined by matching tags and by how recently the content was updated; keeping the most current at the top. Share your feedback on WikiFoundry Central.)